Isosceles Follies I

click on image to enlarge (except mobile devices)

Isosceles Follies, 2020
uv cured inkjet on shaped composite aluminum panel
edition of 3
dimensions variable (overall 48″ x 48″

“Isosceles Follies” is composed solely of the two isosceles triangles shown below.

From Euclid’s Elements – Book I – definition XX:

Of trilateral figures, an equilateral triangle is that which has its three sides equal, an isosceles triangle that which has two of its sides alone equal, and a scalene triangle that which has its three sides unequal.

Tipping Point II

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Tipping Point II, 2020
uv cured inkjet on shaped composite aluminum panel
dimensions variable (overall 44″x 44″), edition of 3

From Euclid’s Elements – Book I – definition 20:

Of trilateral figures, an equilateral triangle is that which has its three sides equal, an isosceles triangle that which has two of its sides alone equal, and a scalene triangle that which has its three sides unequal.

“Isosceles Follies” is composed solely of the two isosceles triangles shown below.

Tipping Point I

click on image to enlarge (except mobile devices)

Tipping Point I, 2020
uv cured inkjet on shaped composite aluminum panel
dimensions variable (overall 44″x 44″), edition of 3

From Euclid’s Elements – Book I – definition 20:

Of trilateral figures, an equilateral triangle is that which has its three sides equal, an isosceles triangle that which has two of its sides alone equal, and a scalene triangle that which has its three sides unequal.

“Isosceles Follies” is composed solely of the two isosceles triangles shown below.

Three Hundred Forty Two Quadrilaterals

click on image to enlarge (except mobile devices)

Three Hundred Forty Two Quadrilaterals, 2020
uv cured inkjet on shaped composite aluminum panel
48″h x 36″w, edition of 3

Euclid’s Elements – Book 1 – Definitions, definition XXII, simply says:

“A quadrilateral figure is one which is bounded by four sides.”

So any four sided shape is a quadrilateral. The shape I use in this piece is a form of a quadrilateral that Euclid describes as a kite. Yes, it’s the shape your thinking of, like the traditional flying kite shape.

Per Wikipedia:
In Euclidean geometry, a kite is a quadrilateral whose four sides can be grouped into two pairs of equal-length sides that are adjacent to each other. In contrast, a parallelogram also has two pairs of equal-length sides, but they are opposite to each other rather than adjacent. 

The diagonals of a kite are always perpendicular to each other.

The kite shape I’m using in this piece is the one below. It looks different than the kite above but it’s still a kite. It has two pairs of equal-length sides adjacent to each other and it’s diagonals are perpendicular to each other. It’s basically been squashed where the horizontal diagonal is smaller than the vertical diagonal (shown by dashed lines) as opposed to the more traditional shape, as shown in the illustration above whereby it’s the opposite; the horizontal diagonal is longer than the vertical diagonal.