SPHERISK – 3D Derivative – Asterisk Symbol – CNC Cut Out Print

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SPHERISK I, 2024
cnc cut out uv inkjet on acrylic mounted to composite aluminum
dimensions variable (47.5″ x 47.5″ overall), edition of 3

Detail of SPHERISK I

I’ve been making artworks with the Asterisk symbol but I thought I’d share my own education on its origins. Please indulge me as the nerd in me can’t resist.⁠⁠

The hashtag is getting all the fame. But before the hashtag became so celebrated with the advent of social media, the asterisk has been used throughout the ages. The iconography of the Asterisk is deeply embedded in the human psyche. Ever since humans began mark making that ice age humans left for us to see in caves, the asterisk is present, thought to represent a symbol for stars. The word asterisk derives from “asteriskos,” a Greek word meaning “little star”. The symbol of the asterisk is ubiquitous today, used for annotation in writing, in computer language and mathematics. And let’s not forget its use in today’s language to mask expletives. It’s also been in front of our eyes since the advent by Bell Labs in 1963 of the push button touch tone phone where they put in the pound sign (also known as the number sign and hash sign) on the bottom right and the asterisk on the bottom left. These symbols had no initial use on the phone but thinking ahead they added these symbols for future yet to be invented purposes. So, in these artworks with the asterisk, I’m not solely making formal geometric constructs but also speaking to the power of symbols that carry from generation to generation without much thought that these things helped shape our humanity.⁠

I began creating 2d geometric artworks with the asterisk because I find it geometrically interesting, with its 6 spokes rotated 60 degrees apart and how it fits into a hexagon. So, now working in 3d, I asked myself, what could I do with it 3 dimensionally. I thought about the hexagon and how soccer balls are often stitched together with hexagons and some pentagons. Soccer balls are actually polyhedrons where the surfaces of the polygons are curved to make it spherical. It’s mathematically impossible to make a Polyhedron solely with hexagons without some pentagons. If you look closely at you’ll notice at the top, a yellow 5 spoked asterisk with red fins set into a pentagon. SPHERISK, although not actually a sphere, as it’s made up of flat segmented polygons, has the effect of being a sphere. The more polygons, the rounder it feels. SPHERISK has 110 hexagons and 12 pentagons with each polygon embedded with an asterisk sculpted with centers surrounded by fins that curve up and sprout metallic cylinders.

Ohio Arts Council 2023 Juried Biennial at the Medici Museum of Art

The Ohio Arts Council 2023 Juried Biennial has traveled from its original location at the OAC’s Riffe Gallery in Columbus Ohio to the Medici Museum of Art in Warren Ohio. My work , QUADRAMID V, was created from a 3D structure, modeled in the 3D cad program Moment of Inspiration and rendered in the program Blender. Click here to see an animation of the 3d model. I’m honored to be included with this wonderful group of artworks from artist across the state of Ohio.

Over 1,600 pieces of contemporary art were submitted to Ohio Arts Council. Only 63 pieces were chosen for the exhibition.

The exhibit features different art mediums from installation to fiberwork. The exhibition runs to April 5th.

Special Thanks to Alex Jesko, artist and Curator at the Medici for these photos. On a side note, I discovered Alex Jesko’s art. He had a solo show at the Medici. His work is fantastic. Visit alexjesko.com to explore.

Click here to see gallery of all the artworks and Artist Statements in the exhibition.

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From left to right:
Zach Van Horn, “Empty House,” 2022, Oil and acrylic on paper mounted on wood panels and framed, 40″ x 40″ x 1.5″
Andrew Reach, “QUADRAMID V”, cnc cut uv inkjet on acrylic mounted to composite aluminum, 47.5″ x 47.5″ x 2″
Jennifer Geraci, “Energia,” 2023, Oil, 36″ x 48″ x 1.5″

Left:
Molly Fitzpatrick, “Traveler,” 2022, Cotton, 24″ x 36″ x 2″

From left to right:
Kari Djuve, “When I Began to Remember,” 2023, Oil on wood, 29″ x 29″ x 1.5″
Bernard Palchick, “Liminal Space 28: Disconnect,” 2023, Oil paint and marker on linen, 36″ x 48″ x 2″
Molly Fitzpatrick, “Traveler,” 2022, Cotton, 24″ x 36″ x 2″
Zach Van Horn, “Empty House,” 2022, Oil and acrylic on paper mounted on wood panels and framed, 40″ x 40″ x 1.5″
Andrew Reach, “QUADRAMID V”, cnc cut uv inkjet on acrylic mounted to composite aluminum, 47.5″ x 47.5″ x 2″
Jennifer Geraci, “Energia,” 2023, Oil, 36″ x 48″ x 1.5″


Foreground Room from left to right:
Elham Bayati, “Hidden Love,” 2022, Pen, 32″ x 22″
Jeanie Coy Auseon, “Together Again for the First Time 1,” 2023, Acrylic paints, fabric on wood, collage 30″ x 30″ x 1.5″
Ana England, “Protect,” 2022, Aqua resin, polystyrene, snail shells, burnished ceramic, flocking, and epoxy, 36″ x 30″ x 11″

From left to right:
Lynda McClanahan, “Swan Maiden,” 2023, Oil enamel on wooden tray, 28″ x 21″ x 1″
Nick Stull, “Kara in the Desert,” 2023, Oil, acrylic, aerosol, inkpen on canvas, 30″ x 24″ x 1.5″
Edward Phillips, “Shedding the Binds,” 2023, Oil, 20″ x 16″ x 1″
Kari Djuve, “When I Began to Remember,” 2023, Oil on wood, 29″ x 29″ x 1.5″
Bernard Palchick, “Liminal Space 28: Disconnect,” 2023, Oil paint and marker on linen, 36″ x 48″ x 2″
Molly Fitzpatrick, “Traveler,” 2022, Cotton, 24″ x 36″ x 2″
Zach Van Horn, “Empty House,” 2022, Oil and acrylic on paper mounted on wood panels and framed, 40″ x 40″ x 1.5″
Andrew Reach, “QUADRAMID V”, cnc cut uv inkjet on acrylic mounted to composite aluminum, 47.5″ x 47.5″ x 2″
Jennifer Geraci, “Energia,” 2023, Oil, 36″ x 48″ x 1.5″
Sarah Dugger, “Snip & Sip at Six,” 2021, Acrylic on oversized watercolor paper, 36″ x 42″ x 1″
(on pedestal) Cynthia Petry, “Unknown Series-Russell,” 2023, Knives with found photographs and bees wax, 14″ x 13″ x 3″
Aimee Lee, “The Walls Are No Defense,” 2022, Handmade abaca paper, monofilament, clips, 80″ x 97″ x 4″
David LaPalombara, “Frying Pan Hollow,” 2023, Oil on hardwood panel, 18″ x 24″ x 1″
Kasey Kania, “Shadow Over Bend,” 2022, Watercolor, oil pastel, and pencil, 18″ x 24″
Nicole Luga, “Cold in Cleveland,” 2023, Oil on panel, 25″ x 25″ x 2″
Raymond Ramos, “On A Cold COVID Night,” 2021, Oil, 49″ x 38″ x 2″


ESCAPE HASH Pavilion – Architecture & Sculpture

ESCAPE HASH Pavilion would connect people in personal ways as so many of us have a relationship with social media in our daily lives. The hash symbol with its use in hash-tagging being an object unto itself as sculpture represents our modern times (for good and bad); where data is turned into meta-data; where information is categorized and made searchable; where so many find their voices amongst the billions of souls vying to be seen and heard. The form is inscribed within a rhombohedron which gives it its slant of 7 degrees on both the x and y axes. I did this because the vertical members of the hash sign are slanted while the horizontal members aren’t. The structure sits on 4 concrete plinths. Openings between them allow people to walk inside. They are bench height and double as benches to sit on. The design is made up of 8 straight members (members that connect to the base) and 16 L-shaped members, trapezoidal in cross section. These members intertwine to form hash signs on its four sides and on the top. The members would be made from glue laminated timber (Glulam) from sustainably managed forests. Glulam is composed of wood laminations bonded together with durable, moisture-resistant adhesives. The glulam members would be slotted to accept flanges for bolted connections. The bolts would be countersunk. A pattern of circles from these bolts add to accentuate the intertwining forms.

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